On becoming part of the problem.

If I can’t impress you with my quality I will overwhelm you with my quantity. Emile Zola I have been reflecting a lot of writing recently. I am possibly one of the most prolific education writers out there. There are certainly much better education writers than me, Biesta’s work is pure poetry for example, but…

Flipping the Coin: Generative Learning in Action

Our brand new book, Generative Learning in Action by Zoe and Mark Enser is available for pre-order now! In this post we explain the thinking behind it. It is a question which seemed to dominate the educational world for quite some time: where were you when you first heard about the Rosenshine’s Principles? On first…

Powerful Geography – The Book! (Part 1).

“Anything is geography”. These three words seemed to defined the thinking around the geography curriculum when I started teaching in 2004 and, for a while, this seemed hugely exciting. Geography is such a broad discipline that we could study anything in our classroom, put anything into a program of study, at least until we had…

Worth doing and worth going to do

This is a guest post from the brilliant Alistair Hamill • Head of Geography • SLT (T&L) • Shared Ed. Leader • GIS advocate • Learning Lead in Craigavon ALC • Mainstage speaker at Esri UC • Textbook author • PQH The vital role of fieldwork in the experience of learning geography Listen to a…

The heart and soul of the subject

Remember that thought experiment There is a hot air balloon carrying a scientist, a mathematician, a geographer a nurse. As it drifts out over the ocean it starts to lose height. Something is getting thrown overboard and everyone must justify their place. We are going through something similar as a result of Ofqual’s consultation on…

Row Rows

When I inherited my very first classroom as an NQT, back in ’04, the desks were arranged in groups. This wasn’t really surprising. Both of the schools I had trained in had grouped desks across the school, any other school I had been into had desks in groups and across the school I was now…

Teaching: Fun and games

I enjoyed a discussion yesterday following on from this post from Tom Rogers and Mr Hodges. As is so often the case, when you start talking about something you realise you agree far more than you disagree but it still got me thinking about different understandings of “fun” in the classroom. When I began teaching,…

A Remote Chance of Learning

Over the last couple of days Lord Andrew Adonis, Labour peer in the House of Lords and former Schools Minister under Tony Blair, has been raising eyebrows with a series of tweets on how he believes schools should be setting work during the lockdown. Yesterday he announced he was talking to former head of Ofsted,…

Experiential Learning in the Classroom

Elements of experiential learning theory (ELT) and of other constructivist learning theories were popular in the early years of my teaching (2003 onwards). The reading that dominated my initial teacher training was from and about Piaget, Freire and Vygotsky and Dale’s Cone of Learning often dominated early Continuous Professional Development sessions in school. Experiential learning…

Remote Learning: Impossible Desires

In Teach Like Nobody’s Watching I argued that the process of teaching something, when you strip it back, is remarkably simple. If you watch anyone from children to experienced professionals teach you see the same things: recap of what you think they already know, give them some new information or instruction, get them to try…